The Future of Health

The Future of Health Care is Staying Healthy

The US currently spends over $3 trillion dollars (or 18% of its GDP) on health care. This is significantly higher than most other countries and is twice the per capita average of other developed countries. Further, partially driven by an aging population, health care is expected to reach 20% of GDP by 2025, representing nearly $5.5 trillion dollars. These are huge numbers.  While health care is a complicated and controversial subject, it is clear that we need to find ways to rein in spending.

The future of health care is staying healthy. This was a theme of the recent Lake Nona Impact Forum, an annual gathering that brings together the nation’s top CEOs, health care innovators and thought leaders. One health expert, Ezekiel Emanuel, concluded that our country is “over hospitaled”, estimating that over 1,000 hospitals, or approx. 20% of the nation’s supply, are destined to close with a shift away from services provided in institutions to those in the community. All agreed that changes ahead are profound.

Not a Triple but a Quadruple Aim -> Consumer Engagement

Back in 2010, the US health care administration introduced the goal of a “triple aim”: (i) improving quality of care, (ii) improving health of populations, and (iii) reducing the per capita cost. Today, some argue it should be a “quadruple aim” adding consumer engagement. We need to find ways for more people to be motivated to stay healthy so we can shift resources from managing sickness to staying healthy. This is a particularly important task for insurers as well as certain states, such as Maryland and Vermont, who have chosen to be accountable for their total health care spend.

Increasing Role of Technology and Personal Data

Just as it has for other parts of our lives, technology and personal data will play an increasing role in our health. These advances promise to improve outcomes and reduce cost. Telehealth is now a common feature among commercial insurance plans, including UnitedHealth and Kaiser, and consumers have appreciated its convenience and effectiveness. Originally of Jeopardy fame, IBM Watson has focused energies on health care and has partnered with various health care institutions to accelerate health research. Joe Biden’s Cancer Moonshot is a bet on the ability to learn from metadata of millions of people.

Powerful tools are increasingly available to consumers to help stay informed and healthy. Daniel Kraft, a speaker at this year’s Impact Forum, highlights what’s possible with smartphones, peripherals and specialized health apps (“There’s an App for That”). I wear an Oura ring that provides accurate insights on activity and sleep patterns, including periods of light, deep and REM sleep. Internet of health things devices, like the Oura ring, can connect to new data consumer platforms, like Curious, to allow people to share data and learn from others.

Housing as Platform for Improved Health

Particularly as we shift from managing sickness to staying healthy, housing, one of the social determinants of health, plays an increasingly significant role. Work at the Bipartisan Policy Center has highlighted the important interplay of housing and health and the need to promote best-in-class options.  Innovative seniors housing providers, such as Juniper Communities, have demonstrated the positive impact of new housing models, including reduced costs and increased health.

At Smart Living 360, enhancing personal well-being is paramount. This thinking influences location strategies, design sensibilities and community culture.  We target walkable mixed-use locations, typically with a grocer in close proximity. Our design integrates in-unit features that accommodate people of all ages and stages, and common spaces are laid out to optimize interaction and utility.  Fitness rooms include a range of equipment to meet a variety of needs and are technology forward. Community programming, facilitated by our Lifestyle Ambassador, is oriented to increasing purpose, personal connection and physical well-being. Our residents report that it makes a difference.

The Evolving Empowerment of You

There has never been a better time in history to live a long, healthy and productive life. As we progress forward, changes in health care delivery, technology and housing will further empower us to take advantage of our increased longevity.